Category Archives: Toronto Street Food

Poutine is Changing Toronto’s Brunch Game

Tired of ordering the same old egg dish for brunch? Looking to try something new to make brunch exciting again? Move over eggs benny, breakfast poutine is on the menu!

 

Top 3 breakfast poutines:

1. Come and Get It:  676 Queen Street West.

Brunch: Saturday and Sunday 10am-2pm.

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Maple bacon, poached egg, hollandaise sauce, mozzarella and cheddar cheese curds on top of crispy fries. This poutine will bring you back to life after last night and power you through the rest of your day.

 

2. Bacon Nation: 170 Spadina Ave and Food Truck around the GTA.

Restaurant opens 9am daily.

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This large portioned poutine comes with a sunny side up egg so you can break the yolk and mix it into breakfast poutine heaven for only $8.

 

3. The Egg Man Food Truck: Downtown Toronto.

Breakfast: Service starts at 7am. Find them here.

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This poutine is filled with all of your breakfast favs: tater tots, bacon, sausage AND peameal bacon topped with homemade hollandaise sauce and fresh herbs.

Combining your favourite weekend activity with your favourite guilty pleasure (Boozy Brunch ideas) makes for a winning weekend.

Leave your winning breakfast poutine stories below.

Skip the Line At Uncle Tetsu!

By now, you or someone you know has waited in line to try Uncle Tetsu’s fresh cheesecake downtown Toronto.

Was it worth the effort? Is it the best cheesecake ever?

Maybe the cheesecake WAS amazing, but you do NOT have the patience or time to line up for cheesecake. No more lines just for a cheesecake!!

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Do not let the Uncle’s charm fool you

Uncle Tetsu has a smooth schedule to give the illusion of an always busy storefront.

According to interviews with the Uncle himself, he says he can only make twelve cheesecakes every 45 minutes, and they must be inspected for quality before it reaches you. So what this means is there will almost always be a line up, and not because of the hype, but because the Uncle intentionally creates one through a slow supply.

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What Toronto foodies are saying

Reviews are super interesting because half claim the cheesecake tastes incredible coming right off the oven (duh), but the other half claim it tastes even more incredible when it has been sitting in the fridge for a few hours (the texture is more dense and the cream cheese is much more prominent after the cool down).

History of Japanese cheesecake in Toronto

Here’s where the story changes: Uncle Tetsu is NOT the only place in Toronto where you can purchase a fluffy, slightly cheesy Japanese cheesecake.

In fact, they’ve been around for quite some time now. Of course, they’re not served freshly baked and hot like Uncle Tetsu’s, but not everyone can gobble down a cheesecake in one sitting, some of it HAS to go in the fridge.

Let your friends know you have better things to do than wait in a lineup for cheesecake!

Skip Uncle Tetsu’s lineup and go here:

1. Bakery Nakamura3160 Avenue Steeles E, Markham.

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This bakery claims to be the first Japanese bakery in Toronto.

Conveniently located across the border between Toronto and Markham. Like Uncle Tetsu, everything is made from scratch everyday in an open-kitchen concept that lets everyone see whether or not hairnets are worn during the creation. They have a range of different cakes available, and the Japanese cheesecake is one. This bakery has been around since 1993, they must be doing something right.

2. T&T Supermarket Bakery: All over the GTA.

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T&T’s bakery section has a vast variety of Asian baked goods and Japanese Cheesecake is one of them.

They might not be as fresh as Uncle Tetsu’s, but when half the reviews online say its better cold, does it make any difference?

If you are a true Uncle Tetsu fan, you might be disappointed to know that the Toronto location has a limited selection of flavours. Well,  T&T has flavours ranging from taro to green tea! You can also purchase a frozen version of  Japanese Cheesecake called Castella. You can spend time browsing authentic Asian groceries rather than standing in line next time you crave Japanese cheesecake.

3. Ding Dong Bakery and Cafe: 321 Spadina Ave.

Don’t let the dingy exterior and interior of this bakery throw you off. Walk inside and immerse yourself in the aroma of delicious baked goods. But don’t get distracted, because you are here to get that Cheesecake!

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And if all else fails, you can always try to make your own cheesecake.

Arepa! Toronto’s sandwich?

Toronto’s love affair with multi-cultural cuisine may have a new answer to the North American sandwich. The story begins in Venezuela with Chef Luis Manuel Cordoba. Luis’ love for food began at an early age with traditional techniques and recipes being passed on through family. As we chat over coffee, I learn that Luis began a pastry restaurant with his brother that lasted for 7 years before he decided to leave Venezuela for Toronto, where he saw opportunity for his flavour and style.

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Chef Luis Manuel Cordoba

Luis arrived in Toronto in late 2009 and soon after began working as head Chef at Queen Street’s Arepa Cafe where he uses “ingredients as fresh and colourful as the Venezuelan landscape.” I ask which dish is the most popular? “Arepa!” says Luis enthusiastically. The Venezuelan “sandwich” is a flatbread made from cornmeal that is grilled and filled with meat, shrimp or veggies. “My favourite is the Reina Pepiada, which means the curvy queen, it is made with roasted chicken, avocado, red onion and coriander” explains Luis. He tells me that the beauty of the Arepa is that it is gluten free and has a unique flavour from its sweet and salty flavour profile. Further, the Arepa is perfect for eating on the go since it’s not messy, it can even be eaten for breakfast when made with eggs.

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Arepas

You will be able to try Luis’ Arepas at CraveTO Day on Saturday August 17th at Honest Ed’s Alley. The name of Luis’ operation is “Mango Pinton“. To jump start your Arepa adventure visit Arepa Cafe 490 Queen Street West.

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